US Politics

In California, Bannon Takes Swipes at Bush, Silicon Valley

Former White House adviser Steve Bannon on Friday depicted former President George W. Bush as bumbling and inept, faulting him for presiding over a “destructive” presidency during his time in the White House.

Bannon’s scathing remarks amounted to a retort to a Bush speech in New York earlier this week, in which the 43rd president denounced bigotry in Trump-era American politics and warned that the rise of “nativism,” isolationism and conspiracy theories have clouded the nation’s true identity.

2 Former Presidents Break With Tradition to Denounce Trump

Former presidents are shedding a traditional reluctance to criticize their successors, unleashing pointed attacks on the Trump White House and the commander in chief - but without mentioning him by name.

Remarks on the same day by former Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama raise the prospect that more dissenters will follow in defiance of President Donald Trump and his policies.

In separate speeches, Bush and Obama both rejected cruelty and bigotry.

US Appeals Court Blocks Teen’s Abortion Access

A U.S. appeals court has blocked an undocumented minor from getting an abortion in Texas, while leaving open the possibility that she could still have the procedure shortly.

The appeals court in Washington ruled Friday that the U.S. government had until Oct. 31 to approve an adult sponsor for the minor who could help the teen get an abortion without the government’s assistance.

The court said the requirement that a sponsor be found does not “unduly burden” the girl’s right to an abortion.

Escalation of case

US Defense Secretary Meets with McCain Over Niger Attack

U.S. Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis went to Capitol Hill Friday to meet with Senator John McCain after the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee threatened to issue a subpoena for information about the deaths of four U.S. soldiers killed in Niger.

After meeting privately with McCain in his office Friday, Mattis promised to keep better lines of communication with Congress.

“We could be better at communication, we can always improve at communication and that’s exactly what we’ll do,” he said.

US Shutters Special Representative for Afghanistan-Pakistan Office

With the Trump administration's revised South Asia strategy still in its infancy, the curtain has silently fallen on the office of the Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP), ending months of speculations that the State Department planned to eliminate the unit.

The office of the special envoy was tasked with heralding reconciliation efforts with the Taliban and other political factions in Afghanistan.

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